Are There Lawn Clippings In Your Tea?

Are There Lawn Clippings In Your Tea?

You may be getting a little more than what you’ve hoped for in other teas.

And many things that you should never, ever put into your body.

Studies indicate that many teas, including a couple very high-end weight loss teas, include everything from pesticides and chemical dyes to, according to one scientific group, actual grass or other vegetation!

(Below are screen captures from websites of two very popular weight loss teas that indicate they contain both corn AND gluten!)

Popular Weight Loss Tea #1:gluten in skinny me tea

Popular Weight Loss Tea #2:                corn in fittea

Does Your Tea Contain Lawn Clippings?

Last year, the Daily Mail called it a “potentially dangerous wave of food fraud.”

It reported warnings from the independent U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention.

“The organization says many foods contain ingredients which consumers would not expect to have bought,” including tea bags, which might be “bulked up with lawn grass or fern leaves.”

The report specifically underlined the shady behavior of American grocery product manufacturers.1

Dangerous Chemical Dyes…

Even if your tea doesn’t contain lawn clippings, if it isn’t SlimTea there’s a very good chance it contains a variety of artificial colors and chemical dyes.

According to this petition to the Food and Drug Administration2, the European Union’s Environmental Committee voted to ban artificial colorings in foods for babies and children as far back as 2008, as these colorings and dyes have been found to exacerbate hyperactivity in children (among other negative effects).

The report notes that artificial colorings “have no health benefits whatsoever,” yet in some cases have been scientifically demonstrated to have a demonstrable adverse effects.

For example, a common and popular brand of ice tea, Snapple, contains red dye3… and that’s really just the beginning of a long list.

Plastic Toxins from Tea Bags…

Taylor Orci4, writing in The Atlantic, tells an even more disturbing story: Those high-end “silky” or mesh tea-bags are made of plastic, specifically “food grade Nylon” or polyethylene terephthalate (PET).

While the melting points of these materials is quite high (which means there’s little chance of melting the tea bag in your tea), these plastics also have something called a “glass transition” temperature — a lower temperature at which the material begins to break down chemically.

This means that carcinogenic phthalates can leach from the tea bag and into your tea… to say nothing of the estrogenic compounds that heating the plastic might be producing (just as when we learned a few years ago that PET-plastic water bottles can release these chemicals into the water they contain).

When you think about it, then, drinking anything other than pure 100% organic SlimTea  is like rolling a roulette wheel with your health!

You think you’re eating healthy and making good choices for your body, but instead you are introducing, directly into the liquid you swallow, anything from grass lawn clippings and other vegetation, to possibly toxic or neurologically dangerous dyes, to potentially carcinogenic toxins derived from plastics.

What’s worse, our food regulations and the guidelines produced by the Food and Drug Administration simply haven’t caught up to all of these dangers yet, so you could fall victim to the “food fraud” the Daily Mail described.

And all this can happen despite your best intentions.

The Only Healthy Choice

The ONLY choice is to go, not with a grocery store tea, but with a safe, organic, healthy tea like SlimTea.

SlimTea contains no harmful plastics, no pesticides, and no dyes.

In a world full of dangerous possibilities, it is a safe and natural choice.

>>>>>  Read about how SlimTea can be used to CLEANSE your system from nasty toxins you’re exposed to every day…

 

 

 

References

1 http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2268229/Food-fakery-adds-lawn-grass-tea-Healthy-foods-contaminated-cheap-additives.html

2 http://www.wholevegan.com/support-files/petition-food-dyes.pdf

3 http://www.wholevegan.com/food_additives.html

4 http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/04/are-tea-bags-turning-us-into-plastic/274482/